Jennifer Gold

Jennifer Gold

Wednesday, 19 September 2012 18:58

A documented allergy overlooked

A doctor prescribed Donnatal (hyoscyamine, atropine, scopolamine, and phenobarbital) for a man who was allergic to one of its ingredients, phenobarbital. Donnatal is used to relax the muscles in the bladder and intestines and to reduce stomach acid. The community pharmacy’s computer system issued a warning about the allergy, but the pharmacist missed seeing the message while entering the prescription into the computer. The doctor also overlooked the allergy even though it was documented in the patient’s chart. The error was discovered by the man while reading the pharmacy provided consumer medication information leaflet, which listed phenobarbital as one of the ingredients. The man did not take the Donnatal.

Wednesday, 19 September 2012 18:18

A mix-up involving a vaginal ring

Our organization received a report from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) about a mix-up involving a vaginal ring. The mix-up involved two medications that can both be delivered by a vaginal ring. The medication prescribed was NuvaRing (etonogestrel/ethinyl estradiol) but the doctor actually intended to prescribe Estring (estradiol). Vaginal rings release medicine over an extended period of time by inserting a plastic ring shaped device into the vagina (see photo).

Families take medications and vitamins to feel well and to stay well. But did you know that more than 60,000 young children end up in emergency rooms every year because they get into medicines when their parent or caregiver isn’t looking?

Friday, 14 September 2012 15:00

Topical Pain Relievers May Cause Burns

If you've ever rubbed a topical pain reliever—a cream, gel or other product applied to the skin—on a sore muscle or joint, you're familiar with the sensation of warmth or coolness that soon follows.

Tuesday, 04 September 2012 18:25

An accidental over dial leads to an overdose

With millions of Americans suffering from diabetes, there has been tremendous growth in the use of insulin. For convenience, many insulin dependent diabetics carry their insulin in a prefilled syringe available from drug manufacturers. The device is called an insulin pen because it looks similar to a writing pen and can be carried in your pocket. An insulin pen is designed to give multiple injections of insulin after changing the single use attachable needle.

Saturday, 10 March 2012 00:00

Throw away your old medicines safely

Now is a great time to see if any of your medicines should be discarded because they are too old or no longer needed.

This list from FDA tells you what expired, unwanted, or unused medicines you should flush down the sink or toilet to help prevent danger to people and pets in the home. Flushing these medicines will get rid of them right away and help keep your family and pets safe.

Recently we wrote about the tragic death of a 2-year-old child due to an accidental overdose of fentanyl after putting a used patch in his mouth. This was not the first time we wrote about a young child unintentionally gaining access to a powerful medicine. For this reason, we have often emphasized the importance of keeping all medicines up and away and out of reach of young children. But what about older children and teenagers?

topten spot-smTraveling can be hectic enough without the added problem of worrying about your medicines. So when you’re on-the-go, it’s important to make sure your medicine travels safely with you. Here are some things to keep in mind to reduce the risk that something will go wrong: 

Tuesday, 07 August 2012 14:27

Beware of the training EpiPen

Patients who keep an EpiPen on hand in case of a severe allergic attack need to know about a potentially dangerous mix-up between the actual pen and a similar looking training pen.