Jennifer Gold

Jennifer Gold

FDA is warning consumers that a counterfeit version of Teva’s Adderall tablets contain the wrong active ingredients

We received a report from a woman whose child began having seizures while taking a shower. The family immediately called for help. Paramedics took the 11-year-old child to a nearby hospital to be examined. All scans and x-rays were negative. Doctors then ordered blood tests on the child. It was found that the child had an elevated blood alcohol level. This was most likely the cause of the child’s symptoms.

This list from FDA tells you what expired, unwanted, or unused medicines you should flush down the sink or toilet to help prevent danger to people and pets in the home. Flushing these medicines will get rid of them right away and help keep your family and pets safe.

FDA continually evaluates medicines for safety risks and will update the list as needed.

Medicine

Active Ingredient

Abstral (PDF - 1M), tablets (sublingual)

Fentanyl

Actiq (PDF - 251KB), oral transmucosal lozenge *

Fentanyl Citrate

Avinza (PDF - 51KB), capsules (extended release)

Morphine Sulfate

Buprenorphine Hydrochloride, tablets (sublingual) *

Buprenorphine Hydrochloride

Buprenorphine Hydrochloride; Naloxone Hydrochloride, tablets (sublingual) *

Buprenorphine Hydrochloride; Naloxone Hydrochloride

Butrans (PDF - 388KB), transdermal patch system

Buprenorphine

Daytrana (PDF - 281KB),transdermal patch system

Methylphenidate

Demerol, tablets *

Meperidine Hydrochloride

Demerol, oral solution *

Meperidine Hydrochloride

Diastat/Diastat AcuDial, rectal gel [for disposal
instructions: click on link, then go to "Label information"
and view current label] 

Diazepam

Dilaudid, tablets *

Hydromorphone Hydrochloride

Dilaudid, oral liquid *

Hydromorphone Hydrochloride

Dolophine Hydrochloride (PDF - 48KB), tablets *

Methadone Hydrochloride

Duragesic (PDF - 179KB), patch (extended release) *

Fentanyl

Embeda (PDF - 39KB), capsules (extended release)

Morphine Sulfate; Naltrexone Hydrochloride

Exalgo (PDF - 83KB), tablets (extended release)

Hydromorphone Hydrochloride

Fentora (PDF - 338KB), tablets (buccal)

Fentanyl Citrate

Kadian (PDF - 135KB), capsules (extended release)

Morphine Sulfate

Methadone Hydrochloride, oral solution *

Methadone Hydrochloride

Methadose, tablets *

Methadone Hydrochloride

Morphine Sulfate, tablets (immediate release) *

Morphine Sulfate

Morphine Sulfate (PDF - 282KB), oral solution *

Morphine Sulfate

MS Contin (PDF - 433KB), tablets (extended release) *

Morphine Sulfate

Nucynta ER (PDF - 38KB), tablets (extended release)

Tapentadol

Onsolis (PDF - 297KB), soluble film (buccal)

Fentanyl Citrate

Opana, tablets (immediate release)

Oxymorphone Hydrochloride

Opana ER (PDF - 56KB), tablets (extended release)

Oxymorphone Hydrochloride

Oxecta, tablets (immediate release)

Oxycodone Hydrochloride

Oxycodone Hydrochloride, capsules

Oxycodone Hydrochloride

Oxycodone Hydrochloride (PDF - 100KB), oral solution

Oxycodone Hydrochloride

Oxycontin (PDF - 417KB), tablets (extended release)

Oxycodone Hydrochloride

Percocet, tablets *

Acetaminophen; Oxycodone Hydrochloride

Percodan, tablets *

Aspirin; Oxycodone Hydrochloride

Suboxone (PDF - 83KB), film (sublingual)

Buprenorphine Hydrochloride; Naloxone Hydrochloride

Xyrem (PDF - 185KB), oral solution

Sodium Oxybate

Zubsolv (PDF - 354KB), tablets (sublingual)

Buprenorphine Hydrochloride; Naloxone Hydrochloride

 

*These medicines have generic versions available or are only available in generic formulations.


FDA continually evaluates medicines for safety risks and will update the list as needed.  

List revised: November 2013


1Consumers are advised to check their local laws and ordinances to make sure medicines can legally be disposed of with their household trash.

For specific drug product labeling information, go to DailyMed or Drugs@FDA.


Friday, 16 March 2012 00:00

Safety Labeling Changes

In March 2012, FDA required safety labeling changes to be made to 39 products, including five different drugs that now carry a warning that they should not be taken by pregnant women because of the risk of injury and death to the developing fetus.

Birth control pills that contain drospirenone may be associated with a higher risk of blood clots than other progestin-containing pills. FDA bases this conclusion on its review of recent studies on the risk of blood clots in women taking drospirenone-containing birth control pills.

What is the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) doing to help protect consumers from medication errors?

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is advising consumers not to purchase or use “Firminite,” a product for sexual enhancement sold on various websites, including www.firminite.com

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is advising consumers not to purchase or use “VMaxx Rx,” a product for sexual enhancement sold on various websites, including www.vmaxxrx.com

A disturbing trend is occurring in some communities across the US: the “de-nursifying” of schools. As school districts grapple with tight budgets, many nurses have been laid off, and those that remain have been asked to cover multiple schools within the district.

Monday, 07 May 2012 15:38

Avoiding Drug Interactions

There are three main types of drug interactions: drugs with food and beverages, drugs with dietary supplements, and drugs with other drugs. In this Consumer Update video, Shiew-Mei Huang, Ph.D., Deputy Director of FDA's Office of Clinical Pharmacology, provides tips on how to avoid harmful drug interactions.