Jennifer Gold

Jennifer Gold

Tuesday, 24 April 2012 10:42

We value your feedback

Thank you for your submission.


Your information has been successfully processed. If your subject matter requires a response, we will be in contact with you shortly.

MedERRS-for.Information.Page

Med-ERRS, a division of the Institute for Safe Medication Practices, is seeking consumers who are willing to participate in brief online surveys to help identify potential confusion with the names of new non-prescription medications. Consumers will be asked a few questions designed to learn about the risk of errors caused by the similarity of a new product’s name and an existing product’s name. Your identity will remain completely confidential, and your contact information will not be shared with any other organization. An online survey generally takes no more than 10 minutes to complete. A small honorarium will be offered.

If you would like to participate in these surveys from time to time, please click the SIGN UP button below, and you will be taken to a secure webpage where you can provide your contact information. You will then be contacted when participants are needed for a survey.

If you have any questions, please contact Med-ERRS at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Sign Up

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) wants to warn consumers about the possible dangers of buying medicines over the Internet. Some websites sell prescription and over-the-counter drugs that may not be safe to use and could put people's health at risk.

Monday, 02 April 2012 20:35

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Get answers to some frequently asked questions about medication errors and about reporting medication errors.

 

What is a medication error?

Medication errors are preventable mistakes that can happen in labeling, packaging, prescribing, dispensing, and communications when the medication is ordered. Medication errors may involve use of prescription and non-prescription medications, natural health products, imported products and/or devices used to administer medications. Causes include:

  • Incomplete patient information, with the health care professional not knowing about allergies and other medications the patient is using
  • Miscommunication between physicians, pharmacists and other health care professionals. For example, drug orders can be communicated incorrectly because of poor handwriting
  • Name confusion from drug names that look or sound alike
  • Confusing drug labeling
  • Identical or similar packaging for different doses
  • Drug abbreviations that can be misinterpreted

 

Back to Top

Who should report medication errors to this site?

Patients, family members, caregivers or any other individual who may be acting for, or in support of, a patient or client receiving health care, may report medication errors to this site. If you are reporting on behalf of someone you know, you should ask their permission to report the error and be sure that you know all the facts about the incident.

 

Back to Top

 

Why should I report a medication error to this site?

 When you submit an incident report to us, we will review it carefully. We look at different things, depending on the type of error you are reporting. Our goal is to prevent errors that have occurred from reoccurring. We also look for problems that can potentially cause harm. Often, we can recommend ways to prevent the same error from happening to someone else. This will make healthcare safer for other

 

Back to Top

 

 

I had a side effect to a drug. Should that be reported as a medication error?

 

No

Side effects (unwanted effects that happen when drugs are used under normal conditions) are also known as "adverse drug reactions" and are not considered a medication error. Adverse drug reactions should be reported to The FDA Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program

  • Report an adverse drug reaction

 

Back to Top

 

Should I talk to the organization or health professional that is responsible for an error in my care?

ISMP encourages you to speak with a health professional if you think an error in your care has occurred. A health professional can take steps to find out if you have been harmed from the mistake and can help you get treatment if necessary. Also, telling a health professional about mistakes in your care will allow them to learn how and why the mistake happened and may prevent the same mistake from happening again. If your mistake happened in hospital and you are not sure who to talk to, many healthcare organizations have "patient representatives" or "patient advocates" who may be able to help with your concern.

 

Back to Top

 

 

Will ISMP investigate a complaint on my behalf with an organization or health professional that is responsible for an error in my care?

 No


ISMP cannot investigate individual complaints about the healthcare organization or health professional that provided your care. ISMP will also not report the error to a professional regulatory authority (an organization responsible for disciplining health professionals). Formal complaints about a particular organization or health professional must be filed through the governing state in which the incident occurred. Contact your State Department of Health or State Licensing Board for more information.

 

Back to Top

 

Does ISMP believe a health care provider involved in an error should be punished or disciplined for making a mistake?

  

No.

Medication errors are rarely the result of one person making an error. There can be many factors that can contribute to an error. Blaming the person who made the mistake without getting to the root of the problem will not prevent the same mistake from being made by someone else. Reviewing incident reports and suggesting safer ways to prescribe, package, dispense or give medication is a better way to prevent harmful errors.

When we review reports, we are looking for the problems that caused the error so that we can recommend ways to make the system safer. This is a much better way to prevent errors than punishing the person who made the mistake.

 

Back to Top

topten spot-smMost pharmacists, physicians, and consumer advocates believe that to ensure safe medication use, all patients must know important information about the medicines they are taking. Here is a list of the “top ten” questions you should have answered before beginning any new medication:

Wednesday, 28 March 2012 17:48

Mercury Poisoning Linked to Skin Products

Federal health officials are warning consumers not to use skin creams, beauty and antiseptic soaps, or lotions that might contain mercury.

Monday, 26 December 2011 00:00

HCG Diet Products Are Illegal

Anyone who has ever been on a diet—and there are many of us—knows that there are sensible ways to lose weight. These include balanced diets, exercising and realistic goals.

Many people make resolutions to become healthier by eating right and exercising more. Most of the time people focus more on losing weight. That is good as long as it is done over time. Unfortunately, many people look for a “quick fix” to shed pounds rapidly. So, they turn to diet fads and over-the-counter (OTC) weight loss aids. Many of these diets and products are potentially dangerous, and some diet products are illegal.

Monday, 26 March 2012 20:14

FDA Expands Advice on Statin Risks

If you’re one of the millions of Americans who take statins to prevent heart disease, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has important new safety information on these cholesterol-lowering medications.

FDA is warning consumers that Hyland's Teething Tablets may pose a risk to children.