Jennifer Gold

Jennifer Gold

Monday, 16 March 2015 18:06

Don’t open Pradaxa capsules

Those who take Pradaxa (dabigatran) capsules may not know they should be swallowed whole. The capsules should never be broken, chewed, or opened to take the medicine. Studies have shown that the medicine absorbs too fast if the capsules are opened, chewed, or broken. This can cause serious bleeding.

Allergy season is here again. Pollen, ragweed, pet dander, and dust mites can trigger allergies. Your body produces histamines when it comes in contact with these triggers. Histamines can cause a number of reactions including, a stuffy nose, your nose and eyes to run, itchy eyes, and an itchy rash or hives.

Monday, 16 March 2015 17:47

Medicine patches and heat sources

Before leaving the hospital, a woman with bone cancer was given a prescription for a powerful pain medicine, a fentanyl (Duragesic) patch. During her first 2 weeks at home, she was doing well. The medicine was helping to relieve her back pain. But then her family noticed that she seemed confused and was losing her balance. She was also nauseated and had vomited.

Wednesday, 11 March 2015 15:22

Dosing error with antimalarial medicine

Recently a woman notified our organization after realizing her doctor prescribed the incorrect dose for an antimalarial medicine. The woman, who was soon going to travel to a part of the world where malaria is present, discussed with her doctor about taking medicine to prevent malaria. Having taken antimalarial medicine in the past, the woman asked her doctor to prescribe chloroquine (the same medication she has taken many years ago).

Half of all Americans use herbals and dietary supplements to manage the symptoms of illness and improve health.1 However, contrary to popular belief, a new study published in October 2014 suggests that herbals and supplements are not always safe.2

A toddler was admitted to the hospital after taking an overdose of Quillivant XR (methylphenidate). This medicine is used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It had been prescribed for the toddler's older brother.

Wednesday, 07 January 2015 16:53

“Medicines That Don’t Mix”

Bactrim and warfarin don't mix. Some medicines should never be taken together because they can interact with each other in ways that alter their effects. These interactions can be dangerous, even deadly on rare occasions. For example, a commonly prescribed antibiotic, Bactrim (sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim), is often associated with serious interactions with warfarin (Coumadin).These drug interactions are one of the most common adverse events leading to hospitalization in patients taking warfarin. Bactrim causes an increase in the amount of warfarin available in the body. It quickly raises the INR (international normalized ratio), which measures how fast the blood clots. A high INR indicates a higher risk of bleeding. Thus, patients taking Bactrim and warfarin have suffered widespread bruising and serious bleeding episodes. And it's not just Bactrim—other antibiotics interfere with warfarin. A 2012 study in the US found that the risk of bleeding while on warfarin was twice as high for those taking antibiotics, and a study in Canada found a four-fold increase in the risk of bleeding.

Women and their health care providers can look forward to getting more useful and up-to-date information over the next few years about the effects of medicines during pregnancy and breastfeeding.

Friday, 12 December 2014 20:17

Insulin pen users: dial-up then push button

If you have diabetes and take insulin using an insulin pen, you may be one of many who are not using the pen correctly. Many insulin pens have a dial on one end of the pen to "dial-up the dose" (Figure 1, top). That same end has a button that needs to be pushed so the dose can be delivered (Figure 1, bottom).

Friday, 31 October 2014 14:34

Cuts on leg following EpiPen Jr use

If you keep an EpiPen Jr (epinephrine) auto-injector on hand in case a child has a severe allergic reaction, you need to know about the risk of cutting a child while the needle is under the skin if he or she moves during the injection. An EpiPen Jr auto-injector is a disposable automatic injection device filled with 1 dose of epinephrine. When the orange tip is pressed against a child's outer thigh until it "clicks" and then held there for 10 seconds, the dose is automatically delivered. Prompt treatment of severe allergic reactions in the home and community can be lifesaving and has resulted in better survival rates and less long-term effects. Most often, auto-injectors are used successfully without complications. But two children recently sustained cuts on their legs when using the EpiPen Jr.