Jennifer Gold

Jennifer Gold

Many people are familiar with over-the-counter wart treatments. They're typically liquid based or are packaged in an aerosol container with a special application tip. But did you know there is also a wart remover that uses a dry formulation in the form of a stick? Within the last year a company called Balassa Laboratories has repackaged an old formula of a solid stick wart remover (previously packaged under the name PediFix). The newly packaged product, called WartSTICK, is now available at popular chain drugstores such as CVS, Rite Aid and Walgreens on-line. Our concern? It looks identical to a container of lip balm. The active ingredient in WartSTICK is salicylic acid, which should NEVER come in contact with the lips or mucous membranes inside your mouth.

Wednesday, 16 July 2014 19:23

Breast milk mix-ups at daycare facilities

Many breastfeeding mothers who return to work utilize daycare providers to care for their breastfed babies. Those who want to exclusively breastfeed their babies will need to plan for the transition ahead. In some circumstances the mother can come into the daycare facility to breastfeed at arranged times. But many mothers do not have this option and will need to provide pumped breast milk to the daycare facility to feed the baby.

There are more theories about teething and "treating" a baby's sore gums than there are teeth in a child's mouth. One thing doctors and other health care professionals agree on is that teething is a normal part of childhood that can be treated without prescription or over-the-counter (OTC) medications.

Certain acne treatments can, in rare instances, cause severe allergic reactions that are potentially life-threatening.

Certain acne treatments can, in rare instances, cause severe allergic reactions that are potentially life-threatening.

Whether you're settling into your sixties or heading into your ninth decade, you should be extra careful when taking prescription and over-the-counter medicines. And if you're caring for older loved ones, you should help them stay safe.

Whether you're settling into your sixties or heading into your ninth decade, you should be extra careful when taking prescription and over-the-counter medicines. And if you're caring for older loved ones, you should help them stay safe.

Thursday, 29 May 2014 20:56

Sometimes Drugs and the Liver Don't Mix

The liver is a remarkable, if underappreciated, organ. It turns the nutrients in our diets to substances the body can use and converts toxins into harmless substances or makes sure they are removed from the body.

We recently heard from staff in an Emergency Department who called the fire department and Bomb Squad after hearing an unknown ticking sound from something inside their sharps container. Unbeknownst to them the source of the ticking sound was an Auvi-Q device (EPINEPHrine injection). AUVI-Q auto-injector is a device which uses digital voice instructions to "talk" people through the injection process. Once the injection iscomplete the user must replace the safety guard and the outer case. If the outer case is not replaced, the electronic voice speaker makes a "ticking" sound as the battery drains. If you or your child has the Auvi-Q device beware that the outer case needs to be replaced or the device will emit a ticking sound as the battery dies. We have notified the manufacturer about this ticking sound. An unknown ticking sound could be particularly alarming in settings such as hospitals, schools, and public transportation areas (buses, rails and airways).

Friday, 16 May 2014 19:48

Insulin pens should not be shared!

Many types of insulin come in a pen device to make it easier to prepare and administer each dose. Although the pens hold numerous insulin doses, each pen is intended to be used by one person only. Even if the needle on the pen is changed, the pen can become contaminated with blood. After an injection, blood or other cells from the person can get inside the cartridge that holds the insulin. If the person has a serious disease such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B, or hepatitis C, it can be passed on to the next person who uses the pen.