Jennifer Gold

Jennifer Gold

Medication safety in the home is an important public health issue. Almost half of all Americans have taken at least one prescription medication in the last month and more than three-quarters have taken an over-the-counter (OTC) drug. Most of these medications are taken in the consumer's home or other residential or community setting. In these settings, the risk of medication errors is ever present as consumers with variable health literacy and unlicensed healthcare personnel undertake the complex processes associated with safe medication management.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has launched its first public health education campaign—"The Real Cost"—to prevent and reduce tobacco use among at-risk young people ages 12-17. Mitch Zeller, J.D., director of FDA's Center for Tobacco Products (CTP), explains why the agency is undertaking this effort and how it will work.

Tuesday, 28 January 2014 00:00

Use Certain Laxatives with Caution

Constipation may not be a subject for polite conversation, but it's a condition that bothers many of us on occasion.

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Few caregivers are more devoted than parents when caring for a child. Yet, even the most cautious and educated parents will make mistakes when giving medicine to children or fail to protect children from accidental poisonings. Dangerous mistakes with medicines are three times more likely with children than adults, and more than half of all accidental poisonings—mostly with medicines—occur in children less than 5 years old. The list that follows, although not inclusive, covers 10 important safety tips for parents

topten spot-smMost people wouldn't think twice about applying over-the-counter (OTC) creams, lotions, ointments, sprays, or patches to the skin. However, the medicines in these products can enter the body just like medicines taken by mouth.

Thursday, 27 March 2014 16:14

Help “Give birth to the end of Hep B”

People may not realize that an infected mother can pass on the hepatitis B virus to her newborn infant at birth. Hepatitis B is a serious, contagious disease caused by a virus that attacks the liver. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the hepatitis B virus can cause lifelong infection, leading to cirrhosis (scarring) of the liver, liver cancer, liver failure, and death.

Since 2009, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has received 14 reports about over-the-counter (OTC) wart remover products catching fire during use. The cryogenic wart removers, which remove warts by freezing them off, are a mixture of liquid dimethyl ether and propane. These products are regulated by FDA and have a clear warning stating that they are flammable and should be kept away from fire, flames, heat sources, and cigarettes.

If you use the new anticoagulant (blood thinner) Pradaxa (dabigatran), take note. Recent publication of two studies suggests that a lower dose and a lab test may limit the drug’s major drawback: high rates of bleeding.

Our organization often hears from consumers who report the quantity of medicine they receive from the pharmacy is less than the amount prescribed by their physician. For example, we recently received a report from a young patient who had dental surgery and received a prescription for the narcotic painkiller Lortab (hydrocodone and acetaminophen). On the prescription the dentist wrote for 24 pills to be dispensed. The patient’s mother had the prescription filled at a local pharmacy. When she returned home she counted only 21 pills. The mother called the pharmacy because she wanted to make sure the pharmacist was aware that a mistake had been made in the count. But the pharmacist became defensive, even suggesting that the woman’s daughter must have taken the pills without her knowledge.

Many parents like to rub numbing medications on their baby’s gums to treat the discomfort of teething. Products for this purpose, called topical anesthetics, are available for purchase over the counter (OTC). Examples include Anbesol and Orajel. There are also prescription products (e.g., viscous lidocaine) that doctors sometimes recommend. However, because of safety concerns, we do not recommend that babies receive medicines containing topical anesthetics.