Videos

 

Grapefruit juice can delay, increase or enhance the reaction of some drugs. Check your prescription labels for warnings of potentially dangerous grapefruit interactions.

FDA's new video, "Taking Acetaminophen Safely" is the latest installment of the Medicines in My Home series. It provides background about acetaminophen, a common over-the-counter pain reliever and fever reducer, and the many different types of medications that might contain acetaminophen; the danger of taking more acetaminophen than directed; how to learn if acetaminophen is in a medicine by looking at the Drug Facts label; and how to take acetaminophen safely. It also encourages consumers to contact their healthcare professionals if they have questions or concerns.

FDA is making it easier for patients, their families, and advocates to get involved in medical product approval and safety through the FDA Patient Network website at http://www.patientnetwork.fda.gov

A medication error is any preventable event that may cause or lead to inappropriate medication use or patient harm while the medication is in the control of the health care professional, patient, or consumer. The FDA frequently reviews and analyzes reports of medication errors on marketed human drugs including prescription drugs, generic drugs, and over-the-counter drugs that come through MedWatch, which is the FDA's adverse event reporting program. FDA also conducts pre-marketing reviews of all proprietary drug names, labeling and packaging to minimize the potential for confusion. Furthermore, FDA educates the public about medication error prevention through public health advisories, medica¬tion guides and outreach partner ships with other organizations.

There are three main types of drug interactions: drugs with food and beverages, drugs with dietary supplements, and drugs with other drugs. In this Consumer Update video, Shiew-Mei Huang, Ph.D., Deputy Director of FDA's Office of Clinical Pharmacology, provides tips on how to avoid harmful drug interactions.

Taking the wrong medication or the wrong dose can be an easy mistake to make. It can also be life threatening. In this Consumer Update video, FDA Drug Safety Expert, Cindi Fitzpatrick, R.N., provides tips on avoiding medication mistakes.

When young children are sick and cranky, it can be tough to get them to take their medicine. Watch this video for tips from an FDA pediatrician on giving the dose without the battle.

Watch the Spanish version, Administrando Medicina a los Niños

Every year thousands of children are hospitalized and some die after taking medicine not meant for them. Teens share stolen prescription drugs at "pharm parties" and toddlers are tempted by colorful pills that look like candy. In this Consumer Update video, FDA pharmacist Connie Jung explains how you can prevent harm by locking your medicine up.

When young children are sick and cranky, it can be tough to get them to take their medicine. Watch this video for tips from an FDA pediatrician on giving the dose without the battle.

All liquid Maalox products are not the same. Maalox Total Relief, Maalox Advanced Regular Strength, and Maalox Advanced Maximum Strength may look similar but they are not interchangeable. In fact, using the wrong one could be harmful.

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