Medication Safety Articles

 

Most people recognize that accidental poisonings in children are a daily occurrence in the US. But you may be surprised to learn one common source of these poisonings: grandparents’ medications! A scientific study conducted at the Long Island Poison Center1 found that about two of every 10 medicine poisonings in children involved grandparents’ medications. Most of these poisonings, caused by what the study participants called the “Granny Syndrome,” involved grandparents’ medicines that had been left on a table or countertop, on low shelves, or in grandmothers’ purses.

A recent news report about a woman who accidentally glued one of her eyes shut when she mistook Super Glue (cyanoacrylate adhesive) for her eye drops is a reminder that the potential for this mix-up is real. The Associated Press reported that a woman who had cataract surgery a year ago was reaching for what she thought was one of her half-dozen eye medications but picked up a nearby super glue container in error. A burning sensation immediately indicated that something was seriously wrong, so she went to the hospital where doctors worked on getting her eye open.

Kaopectate is a medicine used to stop diarrhea. It contains bismuth subsalicylate. This is the same ingredient found in Pepto-Bismol, another medicine used for diarrhea and upset stomach.

Coming up with a name for a new medication isn’t as easy as one might think. Not only are drug makers looking for names that scream ‘take me’ and fix what ails you to consumers, the name also needs to stick in your doctor’s mind.

Many of us have hectic schedules and we sometimes struggle to get a good night’s rest. In fact, it is estimated that 40 million Americans suffer from chronic insomnia (sleeplessness) and an additional 20 million experience episodic insomnia. During these times, we commonly turn to sleep medicines.

Our database of reported medication errors now contains hundreds of cases of accidental mix-ups between adult and pediatric products used to immunize patients against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (whooping cough). Several reports involve errors that affected numerous patients. In one report alone, 80 clinic patients were given the wrong vaccine. In all, these mix-ups may be affecting thousands of patients given that not all cases are reported to ISMP. We first reported this problem in 2006 (Institute for Safe Medication Practices. Adacel (Tdap) and Daptacel (DTaP) confusion. ISMP Medication Safety Alert! August 24, 2006).

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning of the potential risk of overdosing infants with liquid vitamin D.  Some liquid vitamin D supplement products on the market come with droppers that could allow parents and caregivers to accidentally give harmful amounts of the vitamin to an infant. These droppers can hold a greater amount of liquid vitamin D than an infant should receive. Parents and caregivers should only use the dropper that comes with the vitamin D supplement purchased.

People who wear contact lenses may assume that all multipurpose cleaning and disinfecting solutions used for rinsing and soaking lenses are the same. After all, they are stored side-by-side on supermarket and pharmacy shelves. But they are not all the same—particularly regarding how they are used—and serious injuries can occur if these products are used improperly.

The following recommendations are provided to you when chosing a pharrmacy for your services:

It was double trouble for a patient when she and her doctor both made errors and it led to a 4-fold overdose of an antidepressant medication, CELEXA (citalopram Hydrobromide). The patient was starting this medication for the first time and after three days she began to experience severe anxiety, agitation, nausea, and severe fatigue. She called her doctor about her symptoms. The error was identified when they reviewed the medication together and realized what was causing the problem – a medication error.

Medication Safety Alerts

FDA Safety Alerts

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