Medication Safety Articles

 

Many breastfeeding mothers who return to work utilize daycare providers to care for their breastfed babies. Those who want to exclusively breastfeed their babies will need to plan for the transition ahead. In some circumstances the mother can come into the daycare facility to breastfeed at arranged times. But many mothers do not have this option and will need to provide pumped breast milk to the daycare facility to feed the baby.

We recently heard from staff in an Emergency Department who called the fire department and Bomb Squad after hearing an unknown ticking sound from something inside their sharps container. Unbeknownst to them the source of the ticking sound was an Auvi-Q device (EPINEPHrine injection). AUVI-Q auto-injector is a device which uses digital voice instructions to "talk" people through the injection process. Once the injection iscomplete the user must replace the safety guard and the outer case. If the outer case is not replaced, the electronic voice speaker makes a "ticking" sound as the battery drains. If you or your child has the Auvi-Q device beware that the outer case needs to be replaced or the device will emit a ticking sound as the battery dies. We have notified the manufacturer about this ticking sound. An unknown ticking sound could be particularly alarming in settings such as hospitals, schools, and public transportation areas (buses, rails and airways).

If you take the prescription sleeping pill Lunesta (eszopiclone) or generics, you may need to take a lower dose according to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A recent study found that the medicine may still be in the body in high enough amounts the morning after taking it to impair activities that require alertness, including driving.

Many types of insulin come in a pen device to make it easier to prepare and administer each dose. Although the pens hold numerous insulin doses, each pen is intended to be used by one person only. Even if the needle on the pen is changed, the pen can become contaminated with blood. After an injection, blood or other cells from the person can get inside the cartridge that holds the insulin. If the person has a serious disease such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B, or hepatitis C, it can be passed on to the next person who uses the pen.

It's important for women to be aware of an issue with the prescription product Angeliq, a hormone-based medicine used to relieve the symptoms of menopause. Unfortunately, we're aware of errors where it's been dispensed or prescribed improperly as an oral contraceptive.

A consumer recently contacted us about a medication error that occurred with her father's prescription. The prescription was for a highly concentrated form of liquid morphine known as Roxanol.

Medication safety in the home is an important public health issue. Almost half of all Americans have taken at least one prescription medication in the last month and more than three-quarters have taken an over-the-counter (OTC) drug. Most of these medications are taken in the consumer's home or other residential or community setting. In these settings, the risk of medication errors is ever present as consumers with variable health literacy and unlicensed healthcare personnel undertake the complex processes associated with safe medication management.

People may not realize that an infected mother can pass on the hepatitis B virus to her newborn infant at birth. Hepatitis B is a serious, contagious disease caused by a virus that attacks the liver. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the hepatitis B virus can cause lifelong infection, leading to cirrhosis (scarring) of the liver, liver cancer, liver failure, and death.

Since 2009, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has received 14 reports about over-the-counter (OTC) wart remover products catching fire during use. The cryogenic wart removers, which remove warts by freezing them off, are a mixture of liquid dimethyl ether and propane. These products are regulated by FDA and have a clear warning stating that they are flammable and should be kept away from fire, flames, heat sources, and cigarettes.

If you use the new anticoagulant (blood thinner) Pradaxa (dabigatran), take note. Recent publication of two studies suggests that a lower dose and a lab test may limit the drug’s major drawback: high rates of bleeding.

Medication Safety Alerts

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