Understanding blood sugar

 

Blood sugar can be measured at any time of day.  Understanding blood sugar can be hard, but it doesn't have to be!

Information you need to know:

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  1. It is important to know (and write down) what time of day you measured your blood sugar (for example, 3:15 PM).
  2. Also, write down how much time has passed since you last ate and drank (for example, "ate a turkey and cheese sandwich on white bread 2 hours ago").

***Knowing time of day and recent foods/drinks will help you understand your blood sugar.***

"Fasting" Blood Sugar...just a shapshot of your blood sugar control on an empty stomach

isc cameraIf you have not eaten for 8 hours or more, this is called a "fasting" blood sugar.  In people without diabetes, "fasting" blood sugar is usually between 70 and 110 (mg/dL). What is my "fasting" blood sugar goal? The goal for "fasting" blood sugar is often to be between 70 and 150 (mg/dL). Ask your doctor what your goal is.

"Post-Prandial" Blood Sugar...a shapshot of your mealtime blood sugar control

If you ate a meal about 2 hours ago, this is called a "2-hour post-prandial" blood sugar.  In people without diabetes, blood sugar is highest 1 hour after eating and is usually less than 140 (mg/dL). What is my "post-prandial" blood sugar goal? The goal for "2-hour post-prandial" blood sugar is often to be less than 180 (mg/dL). Ask your doctor what your goal is.

A1c...It's like a 3-month video of your blood sugar control

isc videocamera"Fasting" and "post-prandial" blood sugar is just a snapshot.  What about my long-term blood sugar control?

There is a way to measure your long-term blood sugar control.  It's called A1c. A1c is short for hemoglobin A1c.  A1c measures your sugar control over 3 months.  What is my A1c goal? The best goal for A1c is to be less than 6.5%. Ask your doctor what your goal is.

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